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“The Dawn of Vaccination” unveiled at MSU

By | Press

The Dawn of Vaccination, a new bronze sculpture by Jay Hall Carpenter, was unveiled on September 27th at the Michigan State University.  The sculpture honors Dr. Grace Eldering, Dr. Pearl Kendrick, and researcher Loney Gordon for their pioneering work in development of the vaccine for Pertussis, or Whooping Cough, in the 1930s and 40s. The sculpture is the gift to the university from the Peter and Joan Secchia Family Foundation, and it stands outside of the Michigan State University’s Medical Research Center in Grand Rapids.  Carpenter’s remarks at the event included: “. . . Today, before this beautiful building at…

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CBS Sunday Morning Gets Gothic!

By | Press

CBS Sunday Morning has created a wonderful story on Gargoyles and Grotesques featuring many of the 100 or so Carpenter sculpted for the Washington National Cathedral. Sculptor Jay Hall Carpenter and carver Walter Arnold are interviewed:  https://www.cbsnews.com/video/the-art-of-gargoyles/ (4 mins, air date 27 October 2019).  

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Two Poetry Readings In June, 2019

By | Press

EVELYN’S RESTAURANT:  Jay will be a featured poet this June 8 (2019) at 6:30, at Evelyn’s, 26 Annapolis St, Annapolis, MD 21401.  (410) 263-4794  http://evelynsannapolis.com EDGAR ALLAN POE HOUSE & MUSEUM  has invited Jay to read the following afternoon.  Jay will read for 45 minutes – 1 hour on June 9th, at 2 p.m. in this intimate, historic space.  Tickets are required for this event.  Books will be available for purchase.  (The Edgar Allan Poe House and Museum, located at 203 North Amity St. in Baltimore, Maryland, is the former home of American writer Edgar Allan Poe in the 1830s. The…

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Unheard Melodies- On The Poetic

By | Blog

In sculpture we refer to that mysterious, elusive quality we most want in our work as the “poetry.” It would seem only fair then, to refer to those non-poetic qualities of poetry as “sculptural.” By this I mean those elements of craft and form common to both. We focus on the armature, proportion, rhythm, and the location of bony landmarks in the studio; do we not focus on these at the writer’s slope, as well? Consider this description: Whether you measure in feet or meters, the distances between A’s and B’s should be constant. Each line should have a corresponding,…

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JHC Poetry Reading: May 13, 2018

By | Press

DiVerse Gaithersburg will be hosting a Poetry Reading on May 13 featuring authors Jay Hall Carpenter Paulette Beete Laura Shovan at the Gaithersburg Library, Gaithersburg Maryland 2-4 pm.  All are welcome.  JHC will be reading from his poetry book, Dark & Light as well as more recent work.  Dark & Light is available on Amazon and will be available at the event.

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Drawing Group: Embracing The Flaming Struggle

By | Blog

Life Drawing, more than any other medium, is like an improvised performance. For three hours the model strikes poses and the artist must recreate them, call and response. It all happens in the moment. There is no plan. If a drawing doesn’t come together in the time the model can hold the pose, the page is turned and the next pose commands our attention. There is little time to admire achievement, or register disappointment. Michelangelo famously, toward the end of his life, burned most of his drawings. He didn’t want anyone to see the struggle, he explained. We are all…

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Poetry, Three More Things:

By | Blog

As Valentines Day approaches your thoughts may turn to poetry, as have my own. Three things fascinate me regarding poetry and the mind, and I shall set them down here. The Cadence: First is the ability of the simple arrangement of words to churn the imagination. The order of any commonplace sentence can lie inert or bubble to life. By example, I was thinking about my friend Sam, a WWII vet, and his recent funeral: “We buried him today. It was raining.” Not much there, but when I happened to think of “We put him in the ground today, in…

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On Creative Crossover

By | Press

The recent publication of my book of poetry, Dark and Light, has me recalling the words of the great illustrator, Howard Pyle.  He said, “You must throw your heart into a painting and then climb in after it.”  Does it matter that he spoke of painting?  Does this not apply equally to sculpture, writing, or gardening?  Cannot a spark ignite all manner of materials, and is anything illuminated without that spark? Over the past forty years I have had the unusual gift of time.  As I have labored in the clay fields (my studio), my mind has been largely free…

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